Formal education will make you a living. Self- education will make you a fortune.

Wal-Mart Stores and Futures on Oil

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Today evening, I want to rise the subject of Wal-Mart Stores (NYSE:WMT) and Crude Oil Jan 2015 (CLF15). There is lots of comments on the subject of falling oil prices like: http://www.bbc.com/news/business-29643612 and my answer is eg. Wal-Mart Stores. Who knows futher winners ?

 

walmart_oil

 

EDIT 12.08.2014: Today my journey towards higher ROI is… DJ TRANSPORTATION AVERAGE.

 

winner2

 

PKN and Oil:

 

Przechwytywanie

 

 

 

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Financial Times: Best Books of 2014

 

 

The Financial Times published their list of the best books in 2014. It is a good idea to research what was read during last year in FT.

 

Economics

  • Fragile by Design: The Political Origins of Banking Crises and Scarce Credit, by Charles Calomiris and Stephen Haber.
  • Microeconomics: A Very Short Introduction, by Avinash Dixit
  • Political Order and Political Decay: From the Industrial Revolution to the Globalisation of Democracy, by Francis Fukuyama
  • Stress Test: Reflections on Financial Crises, by Timothy Geithner, Random House Business
  • How to Speak Money, by John Lanchester
  • Thrive: The Power of Evidence-based Psychological Therapies
  • European Spring: Why Our Economies and Politics are in a Mess and How to Put Them Right
  • House of Debt: How They (and You) Caused the Great Recession, and How We Can Prevent it from Happening Again, by Atif Mian and Amir Sufi
  • War: What is it Good for? The Role of Conflict in Civilisation, from Primates to Robots, by Ian Morris
  • Capital in the Twenty-First Century, by Thomas Piketty
  • The Dollar Trap: How the US Dollar Tightened its Grip on Global Finance
  • The Euro Trap: On Bursting Bubbles, Budgets and Beliefs

 

 

Business

  • Dragnet Nation: A Quest for Privacy, Security and Freedom in a World of Relentless Surveillance
  • The Second Machine Age: Work, Progress, and Prosperity in a Time of Brilliant Technologies
  • Hack Attack: How the Truth Caught Up with Rupert Murdoch
  • Shredded: Inside RBS, the Bank that Broke Britain
  • The Boom: How Fracking Ignited the American Energy Revolution and Changed the World
  • A Bigger Prize: Why Competition Isn’t Everything and How We Do Better
  • The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution
  • Flash Boys: Cracking the Money Code, by Michael Lewis
  • The Shifts and the Shocks: What We’ve Learned – and Have Still to Learn – from the Financial Crisis, by Martin Wolf

 

Politics

  • Roy Jenkins: A Well-Rounded Life, by John Campbell
  • Contest of the Century: The New Era of Competition with China
  • Revolt on the Right: Explaining Support for the Radical Right in Britain, by Robert Ford and Matthew Goodwin
  • No Place to Hide: Edward Snowden, the NSA and the Surveillance State, by Glenn Greenwald
  • Asia’s Cauldron: The South China Sea and The End of a Stable Pacific, by Robert Kaplan
  • World Order by Henry Kissinger
  • Bending Adversity: Japan and the Art of Survival
  • Talking to Terrorists: How to End Armed Conflicts
  • Age of Ambition: Chasing Fortune, Truth and Faith in the New China, by Evan Osnos

 

History

  • Nixon, Kissinger and the Shah: The United States and Iran in the Cold War, by Roham Alvandi
  • Christendom Destroyed: Europe 1517-1648, by Mark Greengrass
    Stalin, Volume 1: Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928, by Stephen Kotkin
  • Let God Arise: The War and Rebellion of the Camisards
  • The Collapse: The Accidental Opening of the Berlin Wall, by Mary Elise Sarotte
  • The Deluge: The Great War and the Remaking of Global Order, 1916-1931, by Adam Tooze
  • National Service: Conscription in Britain, 1945-1963, by Richard Vinen
    The Tupac Amaru Rebellion, by Charles F Walker
  • A Mad Catastrophe: The Outbreak of World War I and the Collapse of the Habsburg Empire

 

Science

  • Life on the Edge: The Coming of Age of Quantum Biology, by Jim Al-Khalili and Johnjoe McFadden
  • Invisible: The Dangerous Allure of the Unseen, by Philip Ball
  • Risk Savvy: How to Make Good Decisions, by Gerd Gigerenzer
  • The Lagoon: How Aristotle Invented Science, by Armand Marie Leroi
  • A Rough Ride to the Future, by James Lovelock

 

Art

  • Masterpieces in Detail: Early Netherlandish Art from Van Eyck to Bosch
  • Vincent Van Gogh: Ever Yours – The Essential Letters, edited by Leo Jansen
  • Edgar Degas: Drawings and Pastels, by Christopher Lloyd
  • Germany: Memories of a Nation, by Neil MacGregor

 

Architecture & Design

  • Forensis: The Architecture of Public Truth
  • Radical Cities: Across Latin America in Search of a New Architecture, by Justin McGuirk
  • Sottsass, by Philippe Thome

 

Literary Non-Fiction

  • The Iceberg: A Memoir, by Marion Coutts
  • Common People: The History of an English Family
  • H is for Hawk, by Helen Macdonald
  • Do No Harm: Stories of Life, Death and Brain Surgery, by Henry Marsh

 

Fiction

  • The Zone of Interest, by Martin Amis
  • To Rise Again at a Decent Hour, by Joshua Ferris
  • The Narrow Road to the Deep North, by Richard Flanagan
  • Let Me Be Frank with You, by Richard Ford
  • We are All Completely Beside Ourselves, by Karen Joy Fowler
  • Funny Girl, by Nick Hornby
  • J, by Howard Jacobson, Jonathan Cape
  • Redeployment, by Phil Klay
  • The Bone Clocks, by David Mitchell
  • Lila, by Marilynne Robinson
  • Family Life, by Akhil Sharma
  • Some Luck, by Jane Smiley
  • How to be Both
  • Nora Webster, by Colm Toíbín,
  • We Live in Water, by Jess Walter
  • The Paying Guests, by Sarah Waters
  • The Sermon on the Fall of Rome, by Jérôme Ferrari
  • In the Beginning Was the Sea, by Tomás González
  • Boyhood Island, by Karl Ove Knausgaard
  • By Night the Mountain Burns, by Juan Tomás Ávila Laurel
  • Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage, by Haruki Murakami
  • Iza’s Ballad, by Magda Szabó,
  • Frog, by Mo Yan

 

Poetry

  • Poetry Notebook: 2006-2014, by Clive James
  • The Cartographer Tries to Map a Way to Zion, by Kei Miller
  • Hold Your Own, by Kate Tempest

 

Travel

  • The Times Comprehensive Atlas of the World
  • Down to the Sea in Ships, by Horatio Clare
  • The Emperor Far Away: Travels at the Edge of China, by David Eimer

 

Sport

  • O, Louis: In search of Louis van Gaal, by Hugo Borst
  • Played in London, by Simon Inglis
  • The Second Half, by Roy Keane with Roddy Doyle
  • Wounded Tiger: A History of Cricket in Pakistan, by Peter Oborne
  • The Forbidden Game: Golf and the Chinese Dream, by Dan Washburn

 

Food

  • The Virtues of the Table: How to Eat and Think, by Julian Baggini
  • A Year at Otter Farm, by Mark Diacono
  • Make Mine a Martini: 130 Cocktails & Canapés for Fabulous Parties
  • Made in India: Cooked in Britain: Recipes from an Indian Family Kitchen, by Meera Sodha

 

Crime

  • The Silkworm, by Robert Galbraith
    Malice, by Keigo Higahino
  • The Inspector Maigret Omnibus 1, by Georges Simenon
  • The Bone Seeker, by MJ McGrath
  • Falling Freely, As If in a Dream, by Leif Persson

 

Science Fiction

  • Sand, by Hugh Howey
  • Bête, by Adam Roberts
  • Annihilation/Authority/Acceptance, by Jeff VanderMeer
  • The Martian, by Andy Weir

 

Children’s Fiction

  • El Deafo, by Cece Bell, Amulet Books
  • Jane, the Fox and Me, by Fanny Britt and Isabelle Arsenault
  • The Imaginary, by AF Harrold
  • Valentine Joe, by Rebecca Stevens

 

Young Adult Fiction

  • A Song for Ella Grey, by David Almond
  • Fifteen Bones, by RJ Morgan
  • As Red as Blood, by Salla Simukka
  • Lockwood & Co: The Whispering Skull, by Jonathan Stroud

 

____________________________________________________________

Reference link: http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/d79f160a-76bb-11e4-8273-00144feabdc0.html#axzz3LDINciPl

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English Language with News

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Screenshot at 17-41-32

pl Dzisiejszy post podobnie jak poprzedni jest “pisany na zamówienie” dla paru osób i pomyślałem “a niech inni również mają”. Pewien czas temu przeglądając czeluści internetu natknąłem się na http://insider.thomsonreuters.com/ na początku pomyślałem sobie “serwis informacyjny jak każdy inny” jednak kiedy zauważyłem że na dole pojawiją się napisy w tym samym momencie kiedy wypowiedziane słowo, bardzo mi się spodobała ta opcja i często służy mi przy jedzeniu obiadów…

 

Tak wygląda próbka video nagranego przeze mnie.

 

 

 

Wszystko super jednak jest jeden problem, aby uzyskać dostęp Reuters akceptuje jedynie korporacyjne maile (tak było parę miesięcy temu kiedy się rejestrowałem) w razie gdyby było tak nadal i nie moglibyście się zarejestrować podając swój standardowy/śmieciowy adres email dajcie znać może będę w stanie pomóc ;-)

 
en Today’s post is the same as the previous “written on order” for some people and I thought, “and let others also have.” Some time ago reviewing the depths of the internet I came across a http://insider.thomsonreuters.com/ at the beginning I thought, “information service like any other,” but when I noticed that at the bottom are located the subtitles at the same time when the spoken word, I like it, and often serves me while eating lunch …

 

All great but there is one problem to access Reuters only accepts corporate emails (this was a few months ago when I registered) in case it was so still and you could not register by entering your standard / garbage email address let me know I may be able to help ;-)

 

 

beerWhen the post was usefull please click on the advertisment at the bottom of page on the right (before turn off AdBlock plugin- if you have). Thanks !

 

 

 

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Jak zorganizować wiadomości

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plOd jakiegoś czasu byłem parokrotnie proszony przez parę osób żeby wyjaśnić w jaki sposób czytam i gdzie mam zorganizowane wiadomości. Ze względu że nie chcę tracić czasu na wyjaśnianie tej samej rzeczy parokrotnie postanowiłem że napiszę krótki wpis na bloga i jedynie podeślę link do niego ;-)

Ze względu że interesuję się głównie dwiema kategoriami informacji:

 

1. Inwestycje- waluty, akcje, opcje itp. itd.

2. Hi-Tech, R&D- do tej kategorii wpadają takie rzeczy jak: programowanie, java, testowanie aplikacji itp. itd.

 

Piszę o tym na wstępie ponieważ jeśli ktoś tutaj trafił przypadkiem i jest zainteresowany zupełnie innymi rzeczami raczej tego nie znajdzie aczkolwiek znajdziecie jeszcze informacje o historii, troszkę matematyce, językach i… sami sobie zobaczycie o czym jeszcze.

Ten wpis poświęcę narzędziu- agregatowi informacji RSS który nazywa się https://feedly.com podoba mi się hasło reklamowe które oddaje bardzo dobrze oddaje charakter tego narzędzia: “Read more, know more.” W ten sposób aplikacja prezentuje się: (polecam widok pełno ekranowy)

 

feedly

 

Nie zamierzam wiele się rozpisywać na temat struktury samej aplikacji bo wiele nie ma co opisywać. To co bardzo mi się podoba w niej to to że jest możliwość importu/eksportu tzw. pliku OPML, idea jest taka że bardzo łatwo zaimportować kogoś zbiór kanałów RSS jaki dana osoba obserwuje, dla zainteresowanych osób udostępniam swój aktualny plik OPML https://www.dropbox.com/s/fas69rorusovbmi/feedly.opml?dl=0 :

Zachęcam do zapoznania się z tym narzędziem ponieważ znacznie ułatwia organizację czytanych wiadomości i pozwala na korzystanie z wielu dostawców informacji w jednym miejscu. Oczywiście nie uważam że kanały RSS które mam zaimportowane są najlepsze i najbardziej słuszne, zachęcam do komentowania oraz podrzucania swoich stron które uważacie za godne polecenia ;-)

 

Następny post ukaże się niebawem i będzie na temat uczenia się języków obcych i moich przemyśleń na ten temat ! !

 

 

enFor some time ago, I have been asked several times by a few people to explain how to read and where I have organized a message. Because I do not want to waste time explaining the same thing a couple of times that I decided to write a short entry on the blog and just spreading the link to it;-)

Because of my interest in mainly two categories of information:

 

1. investments- currencies, stocks, options, etc., Etc.

2. Hi-Tech R & D in this category fall into such things as: programming, java, application testing, etc., Etc.

 

I am writing this in the beginning because if someone came here by accident, and is interested in completely different things rather do not find but you can find more information about the history, a little math, languages and … see for themselves what else.

This entry devote narzędziu- feed unit with information which is called https://feedly.com I like the slogan that captures very well reflects the nature of the tool: “Read more, know more.” In this way, the application presents itself: (I recommend the full-screen view)

I’m not going to dwell much on the structure of the application itself because there is nothing much to describe. That’s what I like about it is that it is the ability to import / export so. OPML file, the idea is that it is very easy for someone to import a set of RSS feeds which the person is, for the people concerned publish your current OPML file:

I encourage you to familiarize yourself with this tool because it will help you organize read the message and allows the use of multiple information providers in one place. Of course, I do not think that I have RSS feeds imported are the best and most correct, I encourage you to comment and tossing their pages that you think is worthy of recommendation;-)

 

Next post will be released soon and will be on the learning of foreign languages and my thoughts on the subject! !

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Reverse an array- Github’s Gist on WordPress

 

Today, I wanted to check whether there is a simple, fast possibility to inlude the source code from www.github.com on WordPress, unfortunately without the success BUT I found a bit different solution. We can simply publish via Github’s Gists- with help JavaScript code generated by https://gist.github.com:

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Functional Programming Principles in Scala have started ! ! !

 

Today, I just started course on Scala https://class.coursera.org/progfun-005, here is some sample and description:

“Over the next seven weeks you will explore functional programming in a sequence of lectures, quizzes, and homework assignments. We will take you from the fundamental concepts of functional programming to practical solutions for challenging programming problems. This is the fifth iteration of the course; the first one was held in fall 2012. 50’000 students enrolled in that course and almost 10’000 completed it with a certificate. In fact, the course had one of the highest completion rate of any massive open online course. ”

 

On my Github repository I will keep some snippets https://github.com/TomaszWaszczyk/Coursera/tree/master/Functional%20Programming%20Principles%20in%20Scala

 

I encourage everyone to learn Scala. ;-)

 

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What are your flags in JVM ?

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In order to see all your flags in JVH in command line type:

 

java -XX:+PrintFlagsFinal -version

 

rbLCflGhSbAC

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